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Sunday, August 9, 2020 | History

4 edition of Bible and midrash found in the catalog.

Bible and midrash

Lieve M. Teugels

Bible and midrash

the story of "The wooing of Rebekah" (Gen. 24)

by Lieve M. Teugels

  • 287 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by Peeters in Leuven, Dudley, MA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Rebekah -- (Biblical matriarch) -- In rabbinical literature.,
  • Bible. -- O.T. -- Genesis XXIV -- Criticism, Narrative.,
  • Bible. -- O.T. -- Genesis XXIV -- Criticism, interpretation, etc.,
  • Bible. -- O.T. -- Genesis XXIV -- Criticism, interpretation, etc., Jewish.,
  • Midrash -- History and criticism.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. [229]-240) and index.

    StatementLieve M. Teugels.
    SeriesContributions to biblical exegesis and theology -- 35
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBS1235.52 .T48 2004
    The Physical Object
    Pagination246 p. ;
    Number of Pages246
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22670133M
    ISBN 109042914262
    LC Control Number2003070675

    This understanding of how the Bible mystically relates to all of life is the fertile ground from which Midrash emerged. Rabbi Sasso explores how Midrash originated, how it is still used today, and offers new translations and interpretations of more than twenty essential Midrash : Ebook. This midrash assumes that Job and his wife are Jews. The nationality of Job and his wife is not mentioned in the Book of Job and the Rabbis disagree on this question (see BT Bava Batra 15b). In contrast to the view that they both were Jews, another position maintains that Job was a Gentile; while yet a third view asserts that the wife was.

    Such is the case in an article on midrash in the Book of Mormon by Angela Crowley, “Midrash: Ancient Jewish Interpretation and Commentary in the Book of Mormon,” The Zarahemla Record 57 (): 2–4. Crowley at least attempts to show how the midrashic method is applied in the Book of Mormon, although she appears to be basing her approach. Method 3. Interpreting the Bible as midrash. This is a method of looking at the Bible from a totally different perspective. As explained by retired Episcopal Bishop J.S. Spong: 3 "Midrash is the Jewish way of saying that everything to be venerated in the present must somehow be connected with a sacred moment in the past It is the means whereby the experience of the present can be affirmed.

    The JPS Classic Midrash Collection brings together three ancient anthologies of Midrash. The two Mekhilta titles deal exclusively with the book of Exodus, acting as commentaries that exegetically illuminate both the legal (Halakhic) and moral (Aggadic) aspects of the Pesikta de-Rab Kahana presents a collection of discourses for special Sabbaths and festival days. The Midrash: An Introduction sets forth the way in which Judaism reads the Hebrew Bible. In this masterful presentation, the reader is introduced to the classics of Jewish Bible interpretation, with special attention to the way in which the ribbis of Talmudic times read the Pentateuch, the Book .


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Bible and midrash by Lieve M. Teugels Download PDF EPUB FB2

Bible and Midrash: The Story of "the Wooing of Rebekah" (Gen. 24) (Contributions to Biblical Exegesis and Theology, ) by Lieve M. Teugels (Peeters) This two-part book traces the literary and historic study of the story of the 'Wooing of Rebekah' in the Hebrew Bible and its Cited by: 6. “For a fresh and vibrant experience of reading Scripture, open Sandy Eisenberg Sasso‘s highly readable Midrash: Reading the Bible with question marks.

In this book Rabbi Sasso provides a straightforward discussion of the Jewish tradition of midrash—interpretation of Scripture—and how this practice can nourish one’s spiritual life.5/5(11). The Classic Midrash is a series of Biblical commentaries written by the Sages - Rabbinical scholars after the fall of the second temple in 70 CE.

Reading the Midrash is a lifetime work, and I would be unable to do it justice in a single reading and a single by: 9. The Classic Midrash: Tannaitic Commentaries on the Bible (Classics of Western Spirituality) (Classics of Western Spirituality (Paperback)) Only 10 left in stock (more on the way).

The Little Midrash Says: A Digest of the Weekly Torah-portion Based on Rashi, Rishonim, and Midrashim, New Midrashim and Stories (Five Vol. MIDRASH. mid'-rash (midhrash): The Hebrew word corresponding to the King James Version "story" and the Revised Version (British and American) "commentary" in 2 Chronicles ; 2 Chronicles A midrash is properly a story developed for purposes of edification.

The most important Haggadic Midrashim are Midrash Rabboth to the whole Pentateuch and the five scrolls (S of Sol, Ruth, Lam, Bible and midrash book, Esth), the Tanhuma (homilies to the whole Pentateuch) and the Pesikta de-Rav Kanana (homilies concerning the holy days and other special occasions).

These writings became source books of preaching for the rabbis. The present Midrash, therefore, is a loose collection of commentaries, said to be founded on traditions as old as the Bible and Talmud.

Some of its books are reputed to have originated with noted rabbis of the third and fourth centuries. By Rabbi Dr. Azriel Rosenfeld “Midrash” is a summary of the non-Halachic material in the Talmud, based on the classical compilation “EIN YA’AKOV” The Torah not only contains legal principles (“Halachah”), but also teaches many other things from which we can derive important moral and philosophical lessons; this non-legal aspect of the Torah is called “Aggadah.” The “Written.

His brief recommendations have been significantly expanded in Simi Peters's book, Learning to Read Midrash. Peters's book comes after years of teaching the Hebrew Bible and trying to make sense of rabbinic literature that often defies explication. She bemoans the fact that it was difficult to offer students the tools to study midrash independently/5(8).

The process of midrash-making began with the redaction of the Bible, a centuries-long process that began around BCE and ended in the early years of the Common Era. It can even be argued that the Bible itself is midrash: The latter books of Chronicles explain and interpret parts of the narrative presented in earlier books of Kings.

Different religious groups include different books in their biblical canons, in varying orders, and sometimes divide or combine Jewish Tanakh (sometimes called the Hebrew Bible) contains 24 books divided into three parts: the five books of the Torah ("teaching"); the eight books of the Nevi'im ("prophets"); and the eleven books of Ketuvim ("writings").

Books shelved as midrash: The Red Tent by Anita Diamant, Sinners and the Sea: The Untold Story of Noah's Wife by Rebecca Kanner, Hebrew Myths: The Book o. The Midrash Rabbah is the most cohesive collection of Midrash Aggadah, although Midrash Aggadah are found throughout Jewish writings.

The Midrash Rabbah is actually ten volumes, one each on the Torah and the five Megillot (Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, and Esther). Esther is also compared to a wolf, to the moon (see below: “Esther as the Deliverer of Israel”) and to a stove on which everyone places his pots (Midrash Tehilim, on Ps.

Esther’s Age The Book of Esther does not say how old Esther was when she was taken to Ahasuerus’s palace; different midrashic traditions address this question. Lilith in the Talmud and in Midrash Lilith is mentioned four times in the Babylonian Talmud, though in each of these cases she is not referred to as Adam’s wife.

BT Niddah 24b discusses her in relation to abnormal fetuses and uncleanness, saying: “If an abortion had the likeness of Lilith its mother is unclean by reason of the birth, for it is a child, but it has wings.”Author: Ariela Pelaia. In previous articles ("The Book of Jubilees and the Midrash on the Early Chapters of Genesis," Jewish Bible Quarterly July, and "The Book of Jubilees and the Midrash on Noah," Jewish Bible Quarterly April) we saw how the Book of Jubilees dealt with various textual diffi-File Size: 29KB.

@inproceedings{ChanTHEUO, title={THE USE OF MIDRASH IN THE EXEGESIS OF THE BOOK OF RUTH Gap-filling in the Bible and Midrash}, author={Man Ki Chan and Pieter M. Venter}, year={} } Man Ki Chan, Pieter M. Venter Published This article deals with the exegetical approach of the early Jewish.

Romans 1 New International Version (NIV). 1 Paul, a servant of Christ Jesus, called to be an apostle and set apart for the gospel of God — 2 the gospel he promised beforehand through his prophets in the Holy Scriptures 3 regarding his Son, who as to his earthly life [] was a descendant of David, 4 and who through the Spirit of holiness was appointed the Son of God in power [] by his Missing: midrash.

Midrash (from Hebrew: drsh to seek, inquire) can be taken in a broad sense as simply relating to the act of interpreting the Jewish Bible/Old Testament; its narrow meaning, however, concerns a certain kind of rabbinic exegetical literature engaging in biblical interpretation (e.g.

Mekhilta, Midrash Genesis). These works date from around C.E. Midrash. Here are entered general works on the Midrash.

Works on the treatment of specific topics in the Midrash are entered under headings of the type topic in rabbinical literature, e.g. Brazen serpent in rabbinical literature.

See also what's at Wikipedia, your library, or elsewhere. Broader terms: Bible. Midrash represents an intellectual sifting of a text of Scripture to fully understand its significance and application. As opposed to simple, literal readings, it seeks out new, hitherto neglected layers of meaning.

Sasso winsomely explores this process, translating and interpreting 20 essential texts. pages, softcover. Paraclete. Midrash: Reading the Bible with Question Marks Pages: Orpah is one of the secondary characters of the Book of Ruth, which tells the reader only that she was Naomi’s second daughter-in-law.

Like her sister-in-law Ruth, she initially wanted to accompany Naomi and return with her to her land; but, unlike Ruth, she finally accepted her mother-in-law’s arguments and went back to Moab.

The Rabbinic expansion of this narrative, which relates both to.MIDRASH mĭd’ răsh (מִדְרַ֖שׁ, derived from דָּרַשׁ, H, meaning to search, investigate; therefore, a study, a homiletical exposition). The word “midrash” occurs only twice in the OT.

Reference is made to the midrash of the prophet Iddo (2 Chron ) for additional information concerning Abijah, and there is a reference to the midrash on the Book of Kings ().